The Left’s Purity Test?

February 16th, 2010 at 11:49 am David Frum | 29 Comments |

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Erick Erickson poses a direct question to me at RedState.com. It’s long, so I abridge, but you can read the full text here:

The media, liberal Republicans like David Frum, and every left-winger out there has for a year decried, bemoaned, ridiculed, and laughed at conservatives for an alleged “purity test” for candidates. …

But what of yesterday? Senator Evan Bayh of Indiana is bidding goodbye to the United States Senate. He’s had enough. But why? Well, CNN reports this little gem that might otherwise be missed:

“He hates the Senate, hates the left bloggers,” a friend and longtime adviser to Bayh said. “They are getting their wish, pure Democrats in the minority.”

So the left has a purity test? They are running Evan Bayh out of the Senate because he is not liberal enough? Really?

I hope the media and David Frum will spill as much ink and exhale as much carbon dioxide on this as they have the conservative movement’s alleged purge.

The answer comes in four parts.

1)    As a matter of fact, we posted two pieces on the reasons for Bayh’s departure yesterday, one by Jeb Golinkin, the other by me.

2)  But of course I spend more time and energy on the challenges facing my own party than the challenges facing the other. I care more about my party. I want it to win and I want it then to govern well after it wins. As to self-destructive tendencies in the Democratic party: from my point of view, those are opportunities, not problems.

3)    The more troubled the Democratic party, the more urgent it is that Republicans get their house in order so that they can both campaign and govern effectively. As Bayh steps down, and the chances of Republican gains in Congress improve, it becomes even more worrisome that our party’s definition of purity points in directions that do not lead to effective governance.

4) As many political scientists have demonstrated, the parties are becoming more polarized even though the electorate is not. The cause of the “disconnect” (as Morris Fiorina calls it)? Party elites, both Democratic and Republican, have found ways to take command of party institutions and steer their organizations further and further away from the broad preferences of the country. Activists wish their parties to be as conservative (or as liberal) as they can get away with – and voters are confronted at election time with the job of deciding which of two unappealing alternatives is the less obnoxious. It’s endlessly ironic to me that the people most enthusiastic about commandeering parties in this way will describe themselves as “populist” – and condemn as “elitist” those who think that good politics tries to solve the problems that most voters regard as most important.

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29 Comments so far ↓

  • CentristNYer

    Erickson isn’t worth the kilobytes to respond.

  • kensilber

    Erickson seems to buy into the amazing doctrine that if the left does something stupid or unseemly, the right should be less concerned about its own tendencies toward same. See eg the misuse of the word “fascist.”

  • balconesfault

    First, Bayh was not purged. There was no primary challenge being mounted, he had $13 million in campaign contributions in the bank, he chaired two subcommittees. None of his Democratic Senate collegues were saying anything bad about him.

    Some bloggers on the left were critical of him. Wow. A sitting US Senator. I trust that Bayh’s anonymous staffer doesn’t really speak for Bayh, who I would hope would be embarrassed by this plea.

    Second, while Bayh is leaving his Senate seat, there was no indication that he was quitting the Democratic Party. Given that his voting record is to the left of the most liberal Republican, I think he is aware that there is noplace for him in the Republican Party.

    Third, contrary to the claims by some bloggers, Bayh is not “quitting”. He is finishing his term as US Senator. He would still have had to run for re-election this fall to retain his seat, and he knew that he as going to face some very pointed attacks from his Republican opponent regarding his wife’s seats on the boards of insurance companies, and his support for a healthcare bill that was going to pump federal money to insurance companies. The term “quitting” is a reflection of an incumbency mindset shared by both parties, where congressmen are presumed re-elected until proven otherwise.

    Now, if Evan Bayh comes out and says that Harry Reid had signaled that he’d be denied his subcommittee chairs next congress (heck, personally I’d happily have given Bayh the committee chair that Lieberman occupies), or if he had faced a primary challenge from the left, I’d say he was “forced out”. But one can decide that their time is better spent elsewhere without having been “forced” to come to that conclusion.

  • mlloyd

    “Party elites, both Democratic and Republican, have found ways to take command of party institutions and steer their organizations further and further away from the broad preferences of the country. Activists wish their parties to be as conservative (or as liberal) as they can get away with”

    This is true for the GOP, but not the Democrats.

    Democratic leaders for the past decade and a half have all come from the DLC. Clinton, Edwards, and Biden had all supported the invasion of Iraq. The health care bill being debated right now is akin to what the GOP proposed in the 1990s, and to what the Dole commission proposed. The Obama administration recommended that the stimulus be hundreds of billions of dollars less than their own internal math (and subsequent events) suggested was necessary.

    We have one extreme party and one centrist party.

  • sinz54

    I don’t believe Evan Bayh was “forced out” by the Left. He wasn’t going to face a primary challenge, the way Lieberman faced Lamont.

    Evan Bayh quit because Harry Reid has now shown that he isn’t interested in bipartisan solutions to anything. In his speech, Bayh cited the jobs bill–which Reid shot down just last week–as an example of this.

    The reason why Pelosi and Reid aren’t interested in bipartisan solutions is that the Dems are planning to campaign by going negative on their GOP challengers. That tactic worked so well for Martha Coakley, didn’t it?

  • GOProud

    Bayh gave the Congressional Democrats a single finger cheer for a simple reason: working with Senate and House Democrats was more painful than the accumulated power as a Democrat insider and one of the few sane, service-focused Senators in a caucus known for egocentric players, prima donna pols, unchecked self-interest and personal, base corruption. It takes a strong stomach and a deep reserve of willingly lying to yourself day-after-bloody-day that what you’re doing inside the Caucus or the Party really matters as long as the Party fails leadership test after leadership test.

    Bayh was nearly Obama’s Veep. If the drunk Irishman Biden hadn’t rigged the coin-toss, Bayh would be the one responsible for defending the honor of the Obami. Bayh was the ultimate Democrat insider: connected & 2nd generation loyal Democrat, lawyered up to the max, wife making tons of money selling her appearance of influence on corp boards for the Holy Buck$$$, tele-genic like the Barbie-Breck Boi of JohnEdwards, well funded, tough campaigner not afraid to ask for cash and votes, willing to compromise to advance a cause and always focused on the NEXT prize.

    But then, I don’t think Bayh would be in a good position to assist his 1st choice for Democrat Party nominee –Hillary Clinton– to take on Obama for the nomination in 2012 if he’d have stayed with the corrupting, disputed, disparaged Sen Dems and been made to be a part of that unfolding disaster.

    Clinton-Bayh, baby. PUMAs unite! 2012… the Democrats will help the GOP ease the Obami off the stage –exit Stage Left, of course.

  • LFC

    Evan Bayh quit because Harry Reid has now shown that he isn’t interested in bipartisan solutions to anything.

    Wow. Did you type that with a straight face? The GOP is both “The Party of NO” and “The Party of No Ideas”, effectively eliminating any chance for anything resembling bipartisanship.

    In the past 6 months (or 6 years for that matter), what has the GOP proposed in terms of healthcare reform other than tort reform and across state insurance (which will consolidate the players, not expand them, effectively destroying competition which is the thing they are supposed to accomplish). What are they proposing for financial industry reform? What are they proposing to help generate jobs? The answer is nothing, nothing, and nothing. Oh yeah, and tax cuts. That’s a stock GOP answer for absolutely any question.

    My problem with Harry is that he has no spine. Maybe if he had gotten healthcare reform through they could have given him a spine transplant, but that’s sort of a chicken and egg problem.

  • balconesfault

    Bayh’s frustration and failure really need to be laid at his own feet. If he really wanted to form some kind of centrist coalition – he needed to come to Harry Reid with proposed compromise legislation and about 15-20 Republicans signed on to support it, so that Reid could say to Bernie Sanders and Al Franken “this is what we’re going to get – climb aboard or get out of the way”.

    But Bayh never could get a substantial number of Republicans to come aboard, could he? If there was some bill out there where he had put together a big enough bloc of Republicans to co-sponsor the legislation that Reid wouldn’t need the more liberal Democrats to support it, I don’t remember it.

    And as I said before – to a certain extent he was responsible for this failure. Not only by not being able to muster up 15-20 Republicans (which admittedly I don’t think existed to support a stimulus bill that offered anything but tax cuts, or a healthcare bill that actually involved Government subsidies to help the working poor afford insurance) … but by being part of the process that made 60 votes the threshold for any legislation moving forward.

    After all, once Bayh had signaled that he would be willing to join a filibuster of any Democratic legislation he opposed, what argument could Reid have ever made to the 10 or 15 most liberal senators that they shouldn’t join with 35 Republicans in filibustering legislation that they considered too much a giveaway to the wealthy and not enough help for the middle and lower classes?

    Party discipline cuts both ways. Bayh, unfortunately, was hoist on his own petard.

  • GOProud

    Another Faithful Obami Cultie weighs in: “Wow. Did you type that with a straight face? The GOP is both “The Party of NO” and “The Party of No Ideas”, effectively eliminating any chance for anything resembling bipartisanship”

    The GOP brought forth many legislative proposals to Obama, to the WH staff, to Pelosi, to gReid and even to the MSM for examination. On health care. On access to health care and portability of insurance. On controlling medical costs. On a proposed “jobs” bill. On TARP expenditures. On the Stimuli Spending Spree. On regulation of financial services. On immigration reform. On military spending. On Cap & Trade. On czar appointments. On judicial appointments. On earmark reforms. On the Obami attempt at symbolic “$100m budget cuts”. On changing the tone in Washington. On embracing true change, not just hype.

    But they were told by the loyal Obami –gReid, Pelosi, Hoyer, Murtha, Conrad, Schumer, Leahy, et al– nope, we won in November, we rule. Even the high priest himself, Obama Messiah, told the House GOP leadership to get to the back of the line, he won, he would be the decider now on budget cuts.

    Kind of tough to claim the GOP is the Party of No when the GOP put forward lots of ideas that were categorically dismissed by the Obami and even Obama Messiah. It’s actually the Obami that are the Party of No when it comes to even considering, skip embracing or adopting, GOP suggestions.

    By the way, that line of attack isn’t selling with Americans, either. I think you guys might want to go back to the Hopey-Changey Thing; at least no one was laughing at you back then… to your face. Obama’s highly touted “bounce” from the SOTU address is gone… he’s back down in the polls to the tragic, imploding level before the SOTU address… more VOTERS strongly disapprove of the Obami than strongly approve… he’s lost the independents, he’s lost the moderates, he’s lost the 13-17% of GOPers he had on E-Day 08 and, worst of all, he’s losing the MSM he needs so badly to stay in power and defend against a Hillary Clinton-Evan Bayh attack in 2012.

    http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/obama_administration/daily_presidential_tracking_poll

    I think you guys should have stuck with the “GOP is Dead” line from E-Day 08. It’d be as effective as all the current Democrat flailing strategies to spin away from reality.

  • mpolito

    I am inclined to agree with David. To say that the GOP is “extreme” while the DNC is “centrist” is a pretty dubious. The DNC has lurched leftward with Pres. Obama, and who is surprised? A brief perousal of his past should indicate that left is the only way to go.

    Both parties push people out, this is not news.

  • GOProud

    BlankHead opines: “Party discipline cuts both ways. Bayh, unfortunately, was hoist on his own petard”.

    Wow. Stunning that the democrat apologists here are now attacking the very victim of hyper partisanship and failed Democrat leadership in the Senate… Bayh put himself on the spear tip is it? No he just called out Sen Dems for being the hyper partisan divisive idiots we thought all along.

    I think Bayh’s the one who got out of Dodge before the cattle rustlers ruined the town. By exiting, Bayh stuck it to the Democrats who continually treated him like a weak link in a chain designed to strangle, not support bridges to the other side and legislative success.

    Once again, liberal Democrats blaming the vicitm. I bet if these same liberal democrat apologists were in a room with a real victim, they’d demand a loyalty oath before tending to the victim’s complaints.

    Bayh wasn’t hoisted anywhere. The Senate Dems and natl Party got hoisted –and hosed. It’s sweet revenge for all moderate, reasonable, service driven public servants. Bayh was a victim far too long of their partisanship and self-interest and doubling dealing antics. gReid can think “Good Riddance” to Bayh’s exit; lame ducks have a way of continuing to stick it to Party leadership intent on discipline, though.

  • rbottoms

    I think you guys should have stuck with the “GOP is Dead” line from E-Day 08.

    The GOP isn’t dead, it’s just out on a day pass from Arkum Asylum.

    Nearly 350 right-wing protestors crowded a New Mexico town’s busiest intersection yesterday to protest President Obama’s supposed anti-gun agenda and the “government takeover of our health care system.” While the event mostly looked like any other recent right-wing rally — complete with signs reading “replace the communists in DC” and “the sky is falling! A black man is president!” — what set this protest apart was that there “were plenty of handguns and rifles displayed.”

    Time to court the “angry white men”.

    Again.

  • balconesfault

    I think Bayh’s the one who got out of Dodge before the cattle rustlers ruined the town.

    He’s getting out with a $13 million campaign chest, as well. Nice money for fighting off the cattle rustlers.

    Reid can think “Good Riddance” to Bayh’s exit; lame ducks have a way of continuing to stick it to Party leadership intent on discipline, though.

    I doubt that Reid is thinking “Good Riddance”. I’m not particularly sure how he can “stick it to Party leadership” any more, however. He’s supported Republican filibusters in the past, and he’s gone on TV criticizing the Democratic base in the past. I expect he would have continued doing so no matter what he’d announced this week.

    If you’d like to look at polls – yes, voters are disappointed in Obama (except for on terrorism, where 56% approve of his job). Then again, they’re still disappointed in Republicans in Congress even more:

    ABC News/Washington Post Poll. Feb. 4-8, 2010. N=1,004 adults nationwide. MoE ± 3.5.

    “Who do you trust to do a better job handling [see below]: Obama or the Republicans in Congress?”
    Obama Republicans
    “The economy” 47 42
    “Health care reform” 46 41
    “The federal budget deficit” 45 43
    “The threat of terrorism” 47 42
    “Creating jobs” 48 41

    “Do you think Obama is doing too much, too little or about the right amount to compromise with the Republican leaders in Congress on important issues?”
    Too Much 9%
    Too Little 44%
    About Right 45%

    “Do you think the Republican leaders in Congress are doing too much, too little or about the right amount to compromise with Obama on important issues?”
    Too Much 8%
    Too Little 58%
    About Right 30%

    Now that the Dems no longer can override a filibuster, they can no longer make the claim that their participation is irrelevant. If nothing happens going forward, it will take a heckuva ad campaign on their part to convince a majority of Americans that it’s all the Democrats fault.

  • mlloyd

    From Matthew Yglesias:

    http://yglesias.thinkprogress.org/archives/2010/02/what-do-liberals-want.php

    It’s worth reviewing the mainstream liberal policy agenda for the 111th Senate:

    — A $1.2 trillion stimulus.
    — The forcible breakup of large banks.
    — Universal health care with a public option linked to Medicare rates.
    — An economy-wide cap on carbon emissions, with the permits auctioned.
    — Repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell.
    — A path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants.
    — An exit strategy from Afghanistan.
    — An end to special exemption of military spending from fiscal discipline.
    — An independent Consumer Financial Protection Agency.
    — The Employee Free Choice Act.

    None of these things have happened. And it’s worth emphasizing that the White House hasn’t even seriously attempted to do the vast majority of these things.

  • rbottoms

    I think what the let really wants of for Obama to start rhetorically punching the Republicans in the mouth when they pull this kind of crap. Even though I gladly went for Obama in the general, I voted for Hillary in the primary because I wanted someone to take a lead pipe to the GOP.

    Rhetorically speaking of course.

    Rep. Paul Ryan, a Wisconsin Republican who called the stimulus a “wasteful spending spree” that “misses the mark on all counts,” wrote to Labor Secretary Hilda Solis in October in support of a grant application from a group in his district which, he said, “intends to place 1,000 workers in green jobs.”

    Republican Reps. Sue Myrick of North Carolina and Jean Schmidt of Ohio sent letters in October asking for consideration of funding requests from local organizations training workers for energy-efficiency projects.

    The Environmental Protection Agency received two letters from Sen. John Cornyn of Texas asking for consideration of grants for clean diesel projects in San Antonio and Houston. Mr. Cornyn is the chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee. One of the letters was signed jointly with Republican Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, also of Texas.

    The agency also appeared to have received eight identical letters from Republican Sen. Bob Bennett of Utah recommending infrastructure projects in his state, seven of which were sent before stimulus legislation was passed by Congress.

    The entire congressional delegation of Alabama, including its two Republican senators, wrote to then-Forest Service Chief Gail Kimbell asking for $15 million for cogongrass eradication and control programs in the state. The state ended up getting a $6.3 million grant.

    It’s not just the WSJ and Washington Times that are paying attention. The Minneapolis Star-Tribune reports that Gov. Tim Pawlenty used stimulus funds to balance his state’s budget. TPM notes new Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell has privately thanked the administration for offering stimulus funds to his state.

    Based on these and other reports, the Obama Administration is mounting an aggressive defense of the stimulus program, pointing to the ‘slam it in public, beg for it in private’ hypocrisy of its Republican critics. They’ve got a pretty good argument: if Republicans truly believe the stimulus is such a bad thing, shouldn’t their private behavior match their public rhetoric?

  • balconesfault

    The Environmental Protection Agency received two letters from Sen. John Cornyn of Texas asking for consideration of grants for clean diesel projects in San Antonio and Houston. Mr. Cornyn is the chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee. One of the letters was signed jointly with Republican Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, also of Texas.

    By the way, Kay Bailey’s Senate record is biting her in the butt in her run for Governor here in Texas.

    It seems that Perry has convinced the Republican voters in the state that the massive amount of federal money that Kay Bailey has brought back to Texas during her time in office is all “pork” that renders her unqualified for office – Perry’s ads are basically saying she’s as fiscally conservative as Barney Frank.

    I’m wondering if this is going to start putting Republican Congresscritters from Texas into a vise, as they realize that they are going to be damned if they do and damned if they don’t.

    Meanwhile, I note on the links from FrumForum a particularly weak defense by Byron York of Republicans who stuck pork into the stimulus bill … then voted against the bill … and now want to take credit for the pork afterall. You kind of get whiplash looking for any kind of actual principle at work.

  • sdspringy

    Even when the Dems had UNSTOPPABLE majorities they could not pass their agenda. Whose fault, Republicans.

    Typical Lib, Lefty, Not-Me mentality. If the Dems could not pass HCR, C&T, and all the other trash its because even the Dems thought the agenda was TRASH.

    The shock displayed by the Libs of politicans groveling at the pork barrel, no matter party affiliations I find hilarious. Maybe some of the astonished Lib should start attending Tea Parties, OW sorry its just Republican spending you despise, not Democrat spending.

  • sinz54

    balconesfault: If he really wanted to form some kind of centrist coalition – he needed to come to Harry Reid with proposed compromise legislation and about 15-20 Republicans signed on to support it, so that Reid could say to Bernie Sanders and Al Franken “this is what we’re going to get – climb aboard or get out of the way”.
    A simpler ploy would have been for Bayh to just endorse the Wyden-Bennett health care reform bill. That bill had been endorsed by three more Republican senators: Gregg, Crapo and Alexander.

    If Al Franken hadn’t given the Dems their 60th Senate seat, they would have been forced to play ball with moderate Republicans–and something like the Wyden-Bennett health care reform bill would have been the perfect vehicle to do it. Obama would have signed health care reform into law by now. And that would have neutralized some of the anger Americans are feeling at the “do-nothing” government in Washington.

    In a way, the Dems are worse off now than if Coleman had beaten Franken. And so is the country.

  • Muckraker

    Evidentially, I flunked the “Purity Test” at RedState

    http://www.bloggybayou.com/2010/02/wow-i-didnt-expect-this-response.html

    Cheers
    Muckraker

  • sinz54

    balconesfault: I’m wondering if this is going to start putting Republican Congresscritters from Texas into a vise, as they realize that they are going to be damned if they do and damned if they don’t.
    You may find these CNN poll results relevant:
    Washington (CNN) – Only a third of U.S. voters think that most members of Congress deserve to be re-elected this year, according to a new national poll. That’s the lowest number ever recorded for that question in a CNN survey.

    The CNN/Opinion Research Corp. poll, released Tuesday, indicates that only 34 percent feel that current federal lawmakers deserve re-election, with 63 percent saying no.

    According to the survey, 51 percent feel their member of Congress should be re-elected – also an all-time low in CNN polling – while 44 percent say their representative doesn’t deserve to be returned to office in November.

    The numbers on both questions are even lower than in 1994, when an anti-incumbent fever helped Republicans win back control of both the House and the Senate from Democrats. The trend line on those questions goes back to 1991, when they were first asked.

    “This is not a good year to be an incumbent, regardless of which party you belong to,” said CNN Polling Director Keating Holland. “Voters seem equally angry at both Republicans and Democrats this year.”

    Fifty-six percent of people questioned in the survey say that most Democrats in Congress do not deserve to be re-elected. An equal amount also say that most congressional Republicans don’t deserve re-election.

    The poll suggests Americans are split when it comes to their vote this November, with 47 percent of registered voters saying they will support the Republican candidate in their district for the House of Representatives and 45 percent saying they will back the Democrat. Republicans trailed the Democrats by 6 points in November.

    The voters’ cool view of incumbents of both parties “may hurt the Democrats more because there are more Democratic incumbents,” Holland said. “It’s a change from 2006, when voters concentrated their anger at GOP members of Congress.”
    Looks like the voters are poised to vent their anger at most incumbents.

    Since the Dems are the majority party, they’re going to suffer the most from that mood.
    But the Repubs won’t emerge unscathed either.

  • balconesfault

    In a way, the Dems are worse off now than if Coleman had beaten Franken. And so is the country.

    I’m not sure that families who are currently receiving benefits through Medicaid or CHIPS would be better off – and particularly those families who are at higher risk. It’s likely that Wyden-Bennett would have put them at a disadvantage off the bat as private insurers would have been incentivized to design pricing schemes to “cherry pick” the lower risk pool … leaving folks with problems like yours to deal with daunting pricing schemes. Plus, as opposed to Medicaid and CHIPS, those incentives would always be at legislative risk. As such, I doubt it could have ever passed the House, which votes for people over geography.

  • sinz54

    balconesfault: I’m not sure that families who are currently receiving benefits through Medicaid or CHIPS would be better off
    With the Congress we’re likely to get after this year’s November elections,
    you can kiss cap-and-trade goodbye.
    Ditto for immigration reform.

    Voters rebelled against Bush’s pigheadedness and voted in Obama–who tossed the ball to Pelosi and Reid, whose pigheadedness the voters are now rebelling against again.

  • GOProud

    “I doubt that Reid is thinking “Good Riddance”. I’m not particularly sure how he can “stick it to Party leadership” any more, however. ”

    Of course you doubt that gReid is thinking “Good Riddance” to Evan Bayh’s last moment announcement he won’t be running for re-election. After all, you’re still deep in the land of Democrat Apologists Anonymous and reality isn’t a strong suit for you guys. Still got that ample head tucked deep in the dark, cooling sands.

    Bayh can burn –literally burn– gReid over and over between now and, as Bayh -a great point guard in b’ball- puts it… “I’m staying at it and in the game until the last second on the scoreboard”. Bayh can lambast gReid and Sen Dems, Obama and the Obami cult, House Dem radicals led by the curiously MIA NancyBoToxPelosi. He can go to the well of the Senate or the nearest morning talk show and rail against failures of Democrats to lead America out of the harsh, partisan atmosphere Dems helped construct and nuture and maintained… he can do a lot of damage, directly, indirectly to Sen Dems’, House Dems’ and the Obami cult’s efforts to appear to be something they clearly are not. Doubt is the single greatest impediment to raising campaign cash and gReid, Schumer et al need a lot of it this time around.

    The personal animosity between gReid-Obama-Pelosi and Bayh is so heated that Bayh –ever the competitor and litigator– will exact far more revenge than the radical Democrats can ever hope to inflict on him. He’s been burned. He’s been scorned. He watched Jim Jeffords hand it to the Sen GOP leadership and Pres Bush repeatedly. The opening gambit of the late-moment announcement is only the beginning of the payback. And Bayh watched his father play inside basketball under the dome so often, it’s practically in his blood and sweat.

    Of course, Bayh probably agrees with most American voters: 52% say the Obami don’t deserve a 2nd term. I hope Bayh and H.Clinton can make that a reality in 2012. It’s a sweet time for some serious payback.

    You keep that head under the dark cooling sands of Dem Apologist Land; that way when you emerge, you can feign confusion over how “Obama’s mandate” was piddled away.

  • AlVeerhoff

    I think the electorate (including me) simply wants effective governance, and so far we haven’t seen that at the national level for many years. It’s mostly been catfights. Have our elected representatives have no shame? Why must personalities rather than America’s needs drive the agenda? Is anybody looking further down the road than just the end of Congressional hallways?
    We have better leadership at municipal and state levels than in Washington, and when I say Washington I’m not leaving anybody out.

  • GOProud

    rbottoms whines: “Looks like the voters are poised to vent their anger at most incumbents. Since the Dems are the majority party, they’re going to suffer the most from that mood. But the Repubs won’t emerge unscathed either.”

    Don’t ya’ love how the democrats are looking to spin their election losses off as a generalized anti-incumbent movement rather than the repudiation of their agenda, failed leadership and broken promises? Not to mention all the ACORN-unions-Democrats corruption and vote fraud.

    “Republicans won’t emerge unscathed” –I agree!

    They’ll emerge stronger, with more seats in both the US House and Senate (and possibly rescuing the US Senate from an epidemic of corruption, self-interest, failed leadership and closed door meetings), more governorships going GOP, more control in even more state legislatures and maybe –just maybe– permanently disabling the Obami cult.

    That’s not what you had in mind when you declared the GOP to be as dead as the Whig Party, though… was it rbottoms? Like the Democrat Party in Massachusetts, it’s time for your personal serving of sushi crow meat. Enjoy.

  • sinz54

    GOProud:

    Don’t ever, EVER, EVER, confuse me with “rbottoms.”

  • GOProud

    What… I thought you guys were kindred souls. Did I get that wrong?

  • teabag

    “Gay and lesbian state workers in Virginia are no longer specifically protected against discrimination, thanks to a little-noticed change made by the new Gov. Bob McDonnell.

    Read the whole story: Talking Points Memo”

    Don’t you just love these middle of the road GOPers. Makes you want to puke does it not.

  • GOProud

    Actually, as a gay partnered father of three –no, it makes me want to applaud leadership. You, however, TeaBagged, make me want to puke.