Meet Rick Perry, the Teastablishment Candidate

July 25th, 2011 at 7:15 am | 39 Comments |

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The Republican Presidential field has a problem.  The top two candidates are Mitt Romney and Michele Bachmann.

Romney’s issue is that he’s the same Mitt Romney who signed a health care law that the Tea Party considers a Bay State knock-off of President Obama’s “tyrannycare.”  Michele Bachmann’s issue is that she has a history of saying and believing fringe things (remember her flirtations with birtherism?) that render her less electable than a Marxist seeking the presidency of the F.A. Hayek Fan Club.

It’s pure Establishment versus pure Tea Party.  That’s not going to end well…

But wait!  Who’s that dude waving a Gadsden flag and wearing a finely-pressed suit?

Meet Rick Perry, tea party activist .  He’s the guy who signed the cut, cap, and balance pledge, suggested that Texas could end up seceding from a big-government Union, and scorns the existance of “163,000 pages of federal regulations” and a “9 million word” tax code.

Meet Rick Perry, three-term governor of Texas.  He’s the governor who signed a tough tort reform law, responsibly built up his state’s rainy day fund, and presided over an economy that created 38 percent of all new jobs in the United States since the economy began recovering.

A Tea Party loyalist who believes in governing?  A guy who can meet with the Tea Party Patriots and networks with old GOP bulls like Don Rumsfeld?  Somebody with access to the base and the big-money donors?  A candidate who has an economic record better than Romney’s Bain days and throws red meat with all the fervor of a Minnesota congresswoman?

There’s a reason why Perry has quickly shot up in the polls, scoring second in the latest Fox and CNN national surveys.  He offers something tangible to both wings of the party.

If you’re angry at the Obama administration and value tough talk and tea party cred, Rick Perry has something for you.  If you’re interested in a candidate with governing experience and a record of substance, Rick Perry has something for you.

Throw in Perry’s good looks, fundraising prowess, and strength on the stump. Suddenly, you have a guy with a damn solid chance to be the Republican nominee.

Meet Rick Perry.  The Teastablishment candidate.

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39 Comments so far ↓

  • lilmanny

    Again: restoring Barack Obama’s ability to run against George W Bush by nominating a taller, meaner, dumber guy doing a George W Bush impersonation. Great plan. There are very few things that let me know the party of Jack Kemp is dead than, say, Michele Bachmann’s run at the presidency, but I must confess that this guy is one of them.

    Rick Perry in so many ways represents the unfortunate modern GOP brand: southern, intentionally ignorant, angry, dogwhistling to racists, paranoid, more about how he is saying (angrily with a drawl) than what he is saying. I can’t believe this is the solution to save you from Sarah and Michele.

  • Scritor

    There’s also a reason why Texas has skyrocketing teen pregnancy rates, astounding numbers of people without health insurance, very low taxes, and an emerging structural deficit that its uniformly Republican legislature wants to balance on the backs of the poor. And since there are very many low wage jobs with no benefits, there are a lot of poor to take advantage of.

    If you’re interested in worse fiscal mismanagement than George W. Bush, then Rick Perry–or George W. Bush Plus–has something for you. Sometimes he even looks kind of like him.

    • laingirl

      I live in Texas, and what you have said is so true. Texas spends the smallest amount of any state on education on a per student basis, and for school year 2012-2013 it will be even worse. The legislature meets only every two years and there are greater cuts in education in the second year. The rainy day fund was set up specifically for times like this, but Perry refuses to allow it to be used for the purposes it was intended. Several years ago he wiped out the fund for purposes such as bringing low wage businesses to Texas, which businesses in turn made contributions to his campaign.

      • Mannie Davis

        I live in Texas too, and one of the reasons I stayed is Texas’ low cost of living compared to many other states. Salaries here reflect that as well, but on balance, a salary buck goes relatively further here than it does many other places. For example, one can by a 2,000 sq foot house in an established neighborhood with excellent schools for $160,000 to $180,000.

        So one would expect that in a low wage low cost of living state that overall spending per student would be lower than high wage, high cost of living states.

        As they say in the software biz,”That’s a feature, not a bug!”

        • Mannie Davis

          Oh, and I’m not a Perry supporter. Texas modest success is not due to Rick Perry who has not added anything that was not here already.

          Even my staunch Republican friends think Perry’s been a fair to middlin’ governor who has reached his final position under the Peter Principle.

          Rick just isn’t presidential material.

        • WTBoy

          So true. In Texas, you can get a maid or yard worker for about $10 per day. Everything is much cheaper. It’s almost like living in Mexico.

        • balconesfault

          In Texas, you can get a maid or yard worker for about $10 per day.

          Nope. Not true at all. There’s no question that Texas benefits (particularly in the construction industry) from low wage undocumented workers. But they’re not working for Chinese wages. Depending on skillset they’re making at least minimum wage, often at least twice that.

          But without a question, they do work for their money.

          It clearly does benefit a Perry that he has a substantial chunk of the lower-wage workforce who are willing to live in colonias with few or no taxpayer funded utility services, who have no political clout. Hell – I’m sure Perry’s backers would love it if they could deny the vote to anyone who only earns the minimum wage, unless they pass a mandatory [strike]literacy[/strike] theology screening.

        • Mannie Davis

          Not so. The going rate for cleaning ladies here is $80 for a half day. That’s $20 per hour.

          Construction trades make less – $8-12 per hour.

        • WTBoy

          I’m sure there is a range to the wages paid illegal aliens. Some people are apparently much more generous, or poorly informed.

        • NRA Liberal

          Construction at 8-12$ hour?

          Unskilled laborers, maybe.

        • WTBoy

          “Construction at 8-12$ hour?

          Unskilled laborers, maybe.”

          It gets pretty “gray” down here. Many illegal aliens are installing plumbing and electrical facilities in new buidlings. It keeps the price of construction down. I once paid “near minimum wage” to a semi-skilled illegal alien for a day’s work. I took a significant amount of criticism from my peers for “f**king up the pay scale.

    • tlnixon

      Texas has the most minimum wage jobs of any state in the union. Most of those 38,000 jobs were minimum wage service industry. Nothing bad there but not really long term investment jobs.

      • WTBoy

        There are jobs that, for one reason or another, cannot be filled with an illegal alien. Even so, the illegal alien has an influence since there are so many Texans desperate for a job. Minimum wage job openings draw a crowd.

    • buddyglass

      Allow me to respond as if I were a potential Perry supporter:

      There’s also a reason why Texas has skyrocketing teen pregnancy rates…

      Mexicans. Witness the fact that the only states with higher pregnancy rates in the 15-17 category than Texas are: New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada. Also note that blue California is only just behind Texas when it comes to teen pregnancies. Again, Mexican immigrants.

      astounding numbers of people without health insurance

      As it should be, if they can’t afford it.

      very low taxes

      Pure win. There’s a reason Texas has created so many jobs. This, along with less regulation, are it.

      and an emerging structural deficit

      Texas is in better shape than almost every state except a few in the mid-west. North and South Dakota, Iowa, Nebraska. It has also resisted the temptation to raid its rainy day fund; clearly a mark of disciplined restraint on the part of candidate Perry.

      that its uniformly Republican legislature wants to balance on the backs of the poor.

      That’s because the poor already consume more than they produce. Time to right that ship and stop punishing the wealthy for being wealthy.

      And since there are very many low wage jobs with no benefits, there are a lot of poor to take advantage of.

      Unlike in other states where there are no jobs at all. Would you rather the poor be unemployed?

      Perry: Just as conservative as Bachmann but less obviously crazy, and not a closet socialist like Comrade Romney. Plus he’s not a chick or a Mormon.

      • WTBoy

        “There’s a strong argument that the Confederacy actually won the Civil War — not by force of arms, but by taking over the political party that had once been dedicated to its destruction.”

        Reference: http://www.denverpost.com/quillen/ci_17850612

      • jakester

        “That’s because the poor already consume more than they produce. Time to right that ship and stop punishing the wealthy for being wealthy.”
        Yeah right, glad to see how you have your priorities straight. The wealthy are the only one doing well these days because they can count on people like you to pretend they are some maligned victims.

  • Raskolnik

    Curious at the untempered imbecility of this post I asked myself, who is this Zac Morgan?

    “Zac Morgan is a former Bush Administration political appointee and is currently attending George Mason University School of Law.”

    Oh, I said to myself, one of W’s degree-less appointees. Well, that certainly explains this post.

    • lilmanny

      In Zac’s defense, his previous articles on this site appear to take on the GOP and (supposed) conservatives on a number of fronts. That’s not the typical m.o. of a dead-ender Bush appointee and I have no evidence that he’s a Perry homer. Perhaps, like David, he realized the errant nature of the Bush GOP and resolved to do something about it. It won’t work but I really applaud their effort.
      In any case, Rick Perry is not the answer unless the question is “how do we foul this up?”

  • Solo4114

    Eh. I just read this post as a window into the mindset of Perry boosters. It’s nothing new, really. He’s been touted as the “Teastablishment” candidate for a while now. The flipside of this post, however, is that he could be seen as “too much” in either camp for the other. He’s too much of a tea loony to be taken seriously by the establishment, and too much of an establishment stooge to be taken seriously by the tea loonies. Not that this is necessarily the case, mind you, just that it’s a possibility.

    At any rate, being a “teastablishment” candidate might get him the nomination, but I think if you’re a money guy looking for a horse to back, Perry is less of a “sure thing” than Romney…to the extent that such a “sure thing” even exists. I think Perry would have a far more difficult time in the general election than Romney will which is why, distasteful though he may be to the Tea Party folks, he’ll likely ultimately take the nomination. Possibly shoring up his support with Bachman as a VP candidate. Or hey, maybe Perry.

  • cporet

    And remember, he is calling for a gathering in a football stadium for the purpose of praying for rain.

    • balconesfault

      The stadium thing is supposed to be a prayer for all the nations problems … and not just Texas’. And remember – even though it is going to be a Christian event, other denominations are welcome to join in and pray to Jesus.

      Meanwhile, praying for rain is something that we Texans should have been doing for months now, according to Perry.

      I’m figuring that the Christian conservatives may be correct here – and that the current drought in Texas is a sign that God is punishing us for acting against His will.

      Why? Well, Rick Perry got elected to his 4th term as Governor, for starters … if I were God that would disappoint me very deeply.

    • Grace

      One of the few things I’ve seen in the media the past few days that offered an uplifting thought: apparently a sizable number of the nation’s governors will not be able to attend Perry’s pray-away-reality rally, citing plans to wash their hair that day…

      On the downside, even some of the Dems felt the need to beg off Perry’s rally by citing their own prayer plans. What the heck is up with politicans needing to be pastors now? Do we have a critical shortage of folks in the ministry?

  • Graychin

    The previous commenters have done an excellent job of pointing out why Perry would a horrid presidential candidate. He’s George W. Bush without Bush’s compassion and intelligence.

    But in today’s Republican Party (to use the cliche), that’s a feature – not a bug. The problem of electability isn’t on the radar for the True Believers. They’re simply looking for that elusive “true conservative.”

    http://www.mediaite.com/tv/fox-business-charlie-gasparino-rick-perrys-texas-taint-stops-him-from-winning-presidency/

  • jamesj

    Decimating sex education and general education funding, setting up large-scale religious prayer events for the state’s problems, presiding over a steep decline in health outcomes and health insurance rates, suggesting his state secede from the union and then running for president of the union…

    …sounds like a real genius.

  • SteveT

    It’s July 25th. He’s not funding, or organizing a campaign. Exactly how long can the waiting period last?

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  • nickthap

    I’ve lived in Austin for almost two years now, and we will be leaving soon. Back to where we came from, which should probably make the locals happy. Sure, they smile and say hi here, but if you’re not from Texas–or at least not from the south–then you will never really be “accepted,” even in Austin. Hell, even my mother in-law occasionally “insults” me by calling me a Yankee (yeah, I married a Texan).

    I still work for my old company remotely, and have looked for local jobs just for kicks (hi-tech), but the pay is so much lower here that it offsets the supposed lower cost of living and lack of a state tax. My wife took a huge pay cut moving here (health care) and high property taxes end up making the whole deal a break even affair. Jeez, even the schools aren’t that great here (and don’t tell me to move to Waco or Round Rock for good schools ferchrissake).

    Combine that with the heat and lack of recreational opportunities (how many times can you boat on Lake Austin or Travis), and the vaunted “quality of life” thing goes out the window. Texas is definitely the Arizona of the 2010′s and Austin is Texas’ Phoenix. I hope you get the parallel…

    Oh yeah, then there’s good ole’ Rick, who really is on the nation’s finest welfare program: the governorship of Texas.

  • MSheridan

    There are myriad reasons to regret the untimely passing of Molly Ivins. I never thought I’d need to add to the list the fact that she could have greatly entertained the nation and had a hell of a lot of fun commenting on a “Goodhair for President” campaign.

    It’s hellaciously funny that young Mr. Morgan is touting Perry’s prowess at job creation during an economic downturn, when during the period he was speaking of Texas ran up a massive, unsustainable, and completely unmentioned by him deficit. As a Keynesian, I don’t automatically have an issue with that during a time of economic emergency, but Tea Party types aren’t Keynesians. Of course, the Texas budget crisis was “solved” earlier this year, but the “fix” not only failed to take Texas population growth (and associated increased costs) into account but also left the aforementioned rainy day fund mentioned above largely intact. It’s hard to escape the conclusion that it now exists solely to burnish Perry’s political luster. And Texas is still facing a long-term structural deficit, even as it has slashed services past the bone. I don’t see anything to brag on in that record of governance.

  • Lonewolf

    Rick Perry: a $200 haircut surmounting a 50¢ brain-pan

  • NRA Liberal

    Great, another smarmy Texan from the Delay-Armey-Rove-KStreet Project school…mouthing free market platitudes while practicing Big Government Keynesianism (for the rich only, of course).

    I disagree with Bachmann and the Tea Party on most points (Austrian economics, for instance), but at least I respect their principles and their populist, anti-establishment fervor.

  • debby

    He will flame out quickly on the national stage. In Texas, the press and the opposition have been strangely tame. But his shtick won’t travel well and he’ll have to answer questions about why he vetoed a ban on driving-while-texting. Something about personal responsibility or freedom or something unfathomable. And why is that potentially lethal activity a protected personal freedom but women who choose abortion must now have a sonogram – don’t ask how this is performed in the first trimester – and a doctor is mandated to read a prepared script about the procedure’s supposed lasting dangerous effects. And then there is his interference in a forensic investigation into a fire that killed three children. The father was convicted of setting the fire and executed. The evidence is increasingly clear that he was innocent. Perry has done everything he can to suppress this evidence. Will the world beyond Texas be so complacent?

    • Bunker555

      The way he trashed Kay Bailey Hutchison (Senator from Texas) in the TX Gov. GOP primaries was unconscionable. I think Romney will whack him with a superior intellect. My feeling is that Gov. Goodhair knows he’ll never be ready to be President, so he’ll go the way of Huckabee. So will Palin.

    • balconesfault

      debby: But his shtick won’t travel well and he’ll have to answer questions about why he vetoed a ban on driving-while-texting.

      Given the anti-regulatory mood of the current GOP partisans, you truly believe this will make any difference? It may well gain him votes.

      Something about personal responsibility or freedom or something unfathomable.

      Sounds exactly like the vacant rhetoric that won the GOP congressional seats across the country last year. In the GOP primaries, such vagueness is a feature, not a flaw.

      women who choose abortion must now have a sonogram – don’t ask how this is performed in the first trimester – and a doctor is mandated to read a prepared script about the procedure’s supposed lasting dangerous effects.

      Big time winner in GOP primaries, btw.

      And then there is his interference in a forensic investigation into a fire that killed three children. The father was convicted of setting the fire and executed. The evidence is increasingly clear that he was innocent. Perry has done everything he can to suppress this evidence. Will the world beyond Texas be so complacent?

      Someone who wasn’t an openly devout Christian, devoid of political clout, was executed by the state. Do you think this actually matters to the average GOP primary voter? Now, had Perry signed a bunch of stays of execution – THAT would damage his candidacy.

      Bunker555: The way he trashed Kay Bailey Hutchison (Senator from Texas) in the TX Gov. GOP primaries was unconscionable.

      And yet, the GOP voters rewarded him for it.

      That’s one reason I believe there’s a great chance he’ll be the GOP nominee.

  • laingirl

    Some of the skeletons in Perry’s closet the Tea Party people may not like are listed in this story from CBS News: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-503544_162-20082696-503544.html?tag=pop

  • jakester

    The rise in oil prices definitely helped Texas. Also, does every teabag con now have to be some sort of fundy evangelical Christian blowhard these days?

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