Defeating Obamacare with GOPcare

March 18th, 2010 at 8:50 am | 10 Comments |

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If Republicans and moderates and disaffected “progressives” are serious about cobbling together a majority to delay the deeming and passing of the Senate bill, they would be wise to stress their openness to and even eagerness for the passing of a smaller, more targeted reform measure. As Allahpundit suggests, a pledge to make healthcare reform the number two priority next year (behind jobs) on the part of Republican leaders could be effective.

I think opponents of the Senate bill might go even further and state that they want to keep working on healthcare this year. There is a moderate coalition out there in support of a variety of reforms for healthcare.

Currently, the lefty radicals have been driving the debate—that it’s either this bill or no bill, “reform” or stagnation. Centrists cannot let the radicals monopolize the mantle of reform and they should not accept the radicals’ interpretation of history. There are more choices than the partisans pose.

Currently, the centrists are serving as legislative cannon-fodder for many of the radicals in Congress. The actions of Democratic leadership, overwhelmingly supported by the left wing of the Congress, have endangered the moderates’ electoral chances, and now the moderates are being asked (or threatened) to take another big swallow and vote for this measure.

If an authentically moderate reform passes the House and the Senate, the president can sign it and still take credit for it. He might express some disappointment with the limitations of the measure, but he can still sign it with fanfare. Moderate Democrats can still give their president a win, if he wants it.

Opponents of the Senate bill should give fence-sitters something to vote for or at least the possibility of something to vote for. Real legislative reform can happen that can cross party lines. There is a place still for the vital center in politics, Senate bill opponents might remind the undecideds. Voting “no” on this bill need not be a vote for inaction—merely a vote for a different kind of action.


Originally posted at A Certain Enthusiasm.

Recent Posts by Fred Bauer



10 Comments so far ↓

  • SFTor1

    Well, this IS the problem, isn’t it?

    Republicans had the power to pass health care reform for how many years? 16? They did not make a single move to pass any such legislation, except for the Medicare drug benefit expansion.

    But nothing to get those with pre-existing conditions into the system, nothing to cover the uninsured, nothing to reduce U.S. health care costs for the sake of the economy. Nothing proactive, nothing decisive.

    So now you are going to come running with a program that attempts to cover up the obvious: Republicans completely ignored the issue until the 2008 election, when candidate Obama was elected on a platform that included health care reform.

    Maybe it’s a little late for rearguard actions?

  • TerryF99

    That bus left the station with the ‘Death Panels” nonsense. The GOP has brought nothing positive to this debate. The party of “NO” has banked everything on this legislation failing. Now it seems it will pass within days you are trying to get the GOP to support something, anything so they can have a platform.

    Even McCain recognized a real need to reform healthcare. The GOP as a whole over the 16 years they had the ability to do something not so much.

    You must be joking.

  • mlindroo

    Fred Bauer,

    Could you please explain what, exactly, is so “radical” about the Senate bill?
    It is largely similar to hapless GOP Governor Mitt Romney’s reform after all, borrows lots of Republican ideas from the 1990s. It is also more conservative than HillaryCare, thanks to the fact that centrist Democrats and independents such as Ben Nelson, Max Baucus and Joe Lieberman have vetoed lefty ideas such as the “public option”.

    MARCU$

  • COProgressive

    Fred Bauer wrote;
    “Currently, the lefty radicals have been driving the debate—that it’s either this bill or no bill, “reform” or stagnation. Centrists cannot let the radicals monopolize the mantle of reform and they should not accept the radicals’ interpretation of history. There are more choices than the partisans pose.”

    We “lefty radicals” are correct. It is either this bill, “reform” or stagnation. You know it, I know it, but yet you look to spin the story by trying to enlist the “centrists” into your camp of stagnation.

    The “lefty radicals” have bent over backwards conceding on one issue after another, as have the moderate Dems, in an effort to gain the support of even one Repuggie, to no avail.

    No is the time to pass the “reform” of the S&I Insurance industry. I this the bill I would favor? Hell, no! But this bill stinks not because of the “lefty radicals”, but because of the “righty wingNUTS” of last August and the “Astro-turf manipulators” who have worked very hard crapping in the pool of healthcare reform debate to where this bill stinks, but it stinks a little less than the stagnation left by the “GPOcare”.

    “Oh, the Republicans had their shot not long ago to address the real needs and concerns of everyday Americans, and they blew it. I think that’s mitigated by the fact (insert lame excuses here), but over the time that they were there and had the leadership opportunity, they blew it. We got fired for a reason.” – Tim Pawlenty

  • rbottoms

    HBO had a show on in the early 90′s. It was called “Dream On”.

    Fitting title for the GOP’s last desperate gasp to halt health care reform for all.

  • Independent

    Wow, it’s a troll-festival of the highest order trying hard to reassure one another that health care will pass –they deem it so!

    Hey guys, head over to 1600 Penn Ave –the Obami are lagging in spirit a little these days and could well employ some of your gallows confidence. I heard that Rahm and Gibbs and Alexrod actually started swinging fists at each other in a Prez Briefing today… nobody punches the DoughBoi and gets away with it.

    Rahm asked everyone to get naked. Creepy.

  • Independent

    Rasmussen reports today that for the first time in years and years, the American voters now trust the GOP on Health Care more than they trust the Democrats!

    For the Democrats to lose on a seminal, base issue like health care –it’s bad. Real bad.

    Gallows humor may be all you have to bide time until Nov 2010. It’s going to be a black day for you guys –and I don’t mean from ACORN’s new tshirts.

  • mlindroo

    Independent,

    I’ll believe it when I see it…

    Right now health care reform is looking better than at any time since December 2009. While a narrow majority of Americans continue to oppose the reform, the gap is closing. And Intrade is trading at 75 % right now.

    The Democratic party has every incentive to pass this bill. Although individual moderate Dems in GOP districts may prefer to oppose health care reform, the bottom line is they will be every bit as likely to lose in November anyway. The disingenuous pledges of “Allahpundit” and Bauer (‘kill health care reform and we promise to make healthcare reform the number two priority next year [behind jobs]‘) are worthless unless the GOP promises not to field candidates in those districts currently represented by a Democratic incumbent voting “nay”.

    MARCU$

  • mlindroo

    PS:

    Reading Hot Air hasn’t been this much fun in ages:-)

    ———————————————————————————————————————-

    “Collapse: Ohio Dem Boccieri flips from no to yes” — http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/87853-rep-boccieri-flips-to-support-healthcare-bill

    “Gulp: Stupak ready to deal?” — http://blogs.abcnews.com/george/2010/03/stupak-ready-to-deal.html

    “Krauthammer: I think’s going to pass” — http://hotair.com/archives/2010/03/18/krauthammer-i-think-its-going-to-pass/

    “Fox News whip count: 212-219; UPDATE Uh oh: Markey flips from no to yes” — http://hotair.com/archives/2010/03/18/fox-news-whip-count-212-219/

    Etcetera

    ———————————————————————————————————————-

    I understand it’s still close, but Stupak & co. clearly want to find reasons and ways to vote for this bill.

    MARCU$

  • sinz54

    Fred Bauer: If Republicans and moderates and disaffected “progressives” are serious about cobbling together a majority to delay the deeming and passing of the Senate bill, they would be wise to stress their openness to and even eagerness for the passing of a smaller, more targeted reform measure.
    They’re not serious about that,
    and they’re not eager to do that.

    Over on National Review, Mark Steyn was honest enough to admit what this is really all about: Many right-wingers oppose health care reform on ideological grounds. Namely, they don’t want Americans to get the idea that the Federal Government can solve their problems. Once all American citizens have something to gain from a Federal program, they fear that this will lead to a permanent entrenchment of a welfare-state mindset in America. And from there, the death of the market economy.

    Hence to someone like Steyn, the only “reforms” that are acceptable are those that reduce the role that the Federal Government already has. Like privatizing Social Security and Medicare, for example. A proposal to do only half of ObamaCare is still anathema to him.

    History doesn’t bear out these fears.

    Three years after Medicare was enacted, Richard Nixon was elected President. And 12 years after that, Ronald Reagan was elected.

    America’s individualistic culture is deeply rooted in our history, geography, the size of our nation, and our freedoms. Frustrating the dreams of socialists, Americans aren’t suddenly all going to turn into Marxists just because they can no longer be denied health care coverage for a pre-existing condition.

    That notion is just hysteria, every bit as loony as the Leftists claiming that the PATRIOT Act would turn America into a new Nazi Germany or something.

    And I wish my fellow conservatives would just stop it. There are good arguments against implementing any health care reform package without strong cost containment; that’s one lesson we in MA learned the hard way. And polls show that Americans are worried about the costs of ObamaCare and what it will do to their already high premiums.

    But those Americans who are born with pre-existing conditions (like hemophilia), or who get them through no fault of their own (the cause of my illness will likely forever remain unknown), represent a true market failure. In that it’s just not economically profitable for any insurer to have policyholders like us.

    And there’s no way to fix that without government intervention of some type in the marketplace. Yet not fixing it has serious consequences for our society.

    That observation should be what separates true conservatives from libertarians, a distinction that appears to be fading of late.